Review of Seasons of Darkness

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belindagbuchananauthor:

I am honored and humbled to have received such a great review from author Robin E. Mason.

Originally posted on robinsnest212:

The month of October is a special time for me:

my debut novel, my baby,

Tessa,

will be released IN PRINT on Halloween!

WHEEEEE!!!!!

 

BOOK REVIEW – SEASONS of DARKNESS by BELINDA G. BUCHANAN

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Sixteen-year-old Ethan is following in his father’s footsteps. But not career wise, and not by choice.

When life becomes a fragile balancing act between a presentable image and the darkness that torments, Everett Harrington buries himself in his work and hides his feelings – and his fears – in a bottle of scotch. But stuffing yourself in a bottle or a board room is but a temporary fix, and the demons that are hiding eventually show their ugly faces. And with Everett, they showed up as contempt for the son who once was the little boy he so adored.

Everett, apparently, had his life neatly planned out. A solid career, no female distractions…

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Why you must read Belinda G. Buchanan’s Seasons of Darkness – an interview by David Njoku of Indie Author Land

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Everett Harrington, a no- nonsense businessman, should have taken Natalia’s behavior that night as a sign of things to come, but hadn’t. When it came to her, he found himself unable to think clearly.

It was on a scorching afternoon in late July that he had stood at the altar with her, making a promise in front of God and her parents to love her for better or for worse – and it was ten years later, on a rainy morning in September that he’d buried her. The days in between had been filled with brief intervals of happiness…and long periods of hopelessness.

Now, left alone to raise a son he can’t talk to and a daughter that he wants nothing to do with, he chooses to spend his evenings drowning his frustrations in a bottle of scotch, leaving him without the ability to control his temper.

Forced to grow up in a hurry, nine-year-old Ethan Harrington quickly learned to build a wall around his heart, vowing never to let it be hurt again. Now sixteen, and still ravaged by his mother’s death, he struggles to live among the shattered remains of a family that was never functional to begin with.

What genre is this?
Women’s Fiction & New Adult.

A story of hope – even in the darkest of times, this is a coming of age novel that depicts the sometimes difficult and oftentimes complex relationship experienced between father and son when tragedy strikes.

We know we should have guessed from the title, but there are some really dark moments in this story.
Mental illness not only touches those who have it – it consumes their loved ones as well, leaving a haunting impression long after they are gone.

That’s very true.
Seasons of Darkness is for those who like darker themes or taboo subjects. There are some defining scenes in the book. Although they may be difficult to read, they set the stage for Ethan as he becomes a man. Read more

Meet Guest Author Belinda G Buchanan

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Originally posted on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog..... An Author Promotions Enterprise!:

Belinda G Buchanan

Drama is raw. Drama is pure. Drama evokes emotion like no other. That’s why I write it. And when you combine it with tall, dark, and handsome, it’s positively electrifying.

My desire for these things started when I was a little girl playing with dolls. My imagination would create a tumultuous storyline that eventually ended up with Ken storming out of his and Barbie’s dream home and peeling away in her pink convertible.

Years later (I won’t tell you how many) I took this yearning and put it to paper. Minutes, hours, and months slipped away until I had written my first novel. Now what?

I decided to self-publish. I was hesitant at first, but three years later, I can honestly say that I’m glad I went the indie route. Why? Because going rogue allows you the freedom to publish on your own terms, and your own time. Your royalties…

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Meet Guest Author Mike Jecks

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Mike Jecks – Author Extraordinaire

Originally posted on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog..... An Author Promotions Enterprise!:


Michael Jecks 01Hi, I’m Mike Jecks, always writing under the name Michael Jecks, and I’m the author of 35 published books, as well as a bunch of short stories, novellas with Medieval Murderers, and, let’s not forget, five unpublished books.

I never meant to be a writer.

Back in the 1980s, I embarked on a new career in computing. Before that I’d been determined to have a life as an Actuary. What’s that? A mathematician and statistician who applies his brain to insurance and finance problems. Or, as I learned later, having failed every exam for two years, a person who finds accountancy too exciting.

I thought there must be more to life, so I set out to be a computer salesman. And I did very well. My first 5 years saw me as one of Wordplex’s top salespeople; my second 5 years saw me as a successful salesman in Wang Laboratories

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How Do We Truly Forgive Someone?

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This question has been on my mind a lot over the past few weeks.  Are you the type of person that forgives easily, or does it take you some time to get over it?

I have met a few people in my life who have the unnatural ability to truly forgive and forget.  I stand in awe of these fortunate souls, wondering why the hurt seems to roll off their shoulders like water.

Personally, I’m the type that takes forever to get over something.  I catalogue it, commit it to my photographic memory, file it under NEVER, and harbor a grudge for all of eternity.

Yup, that’s me…or at least that was me until about three years ago.  What brought about the change?  Simply put, it was the desire for happiness.

For some of us, the hurt we feel runs deep and is burrowed so far down inside of us, it has literally grown roots.  The more time passes, the longer those roots grow, until eventually, you are not only an angry person, but a bitter one as well.

Elton John wrote a beautiful song for The Lion King called The Circle Of Life.  There is a verse in there that goes ‘Some of us sail through our troubles, and some of us have to live with the scars.’  As humans, some of have been deeply hurt or even traumatized by something that has happened to us as an adult or child.  It has left us emotionally scarred because we can’t let it go…no matter how hard we try.  We didn’t have a choice in this matter-and we absolutely cannot change, or forget, what happened.

Carrying around anger over something that we cannot change can eat us alive.  Does forgiving someone erase what has happened?  Of course not.  But I do know that forgiveness can be healing.  We must let it go.  Once we turn it loose, our heart begins to heal.  It’s not easy by any means, but it’s better than the alternative.  I realized that I didn’t want to grow to be an old and bitter person who has lived my life being angry about something I have no control over.

It was this realization that inspired me to write one of my novels.

The message of forgiveness runs throughout the pages of After All Is Said And Done, where we find Ethan Harrington struggling to come to terms with his wife’s infidelity. Her affair with a colleague of his has left him hurt beyond words.  It’s a hurt that slowly begins to heal with the birth of his son, but it isn’t long before he learns a devastating secret. His drinking, fueled by this discovery, engulfs him, and his marriage soon starts to buckle under the strain.

With his life now in pieces, and his sanity questionable, Ethan is forced to come to terms with his alcoholism and face a past that he has spent a lifetime trying to forget.

After All Is Said And Done is a novel about infidelity, healing, and the long road back to forgiveness.

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My website:  https://sites.google.com/site/belindagbuchanan

View the Book trailer:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmM-Uf6yG4w

Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, itunes, Kobo & Smashwords

Belinda Buchanan is an author of women’s fiction that also includes, Seasons of Darkness, and The Monster of Silver Creek.

My son, myself, and Mass Effect

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Last month, my oldest son asked me if I would play Mass Effect.  

“Sure,” I said, “I’d be happy to play with you.”

“No,” he replied.  “I mean, you play it, and I’ll sit beside you.  I’ll help you out on what to do.”

“Oh…okay.” So we sat down in front of the TV and he handed me the XBOX controller thingy.  Now, mind you, the only experience I’ve had using this controller is when I watch episodes of Call The Midwife or The Walking Dead  on Netflix while I’m exercising on the elliptical – and all I have to do is press the A or B button.

My son got to work creating my character.  “I’ll make Commander Shepard a girl, since that’s what you are.”

“Thanks,” I said with a smile, happy that he’d noticed.

“There.”

I looked back at the screen and felt my smile dissolving.  I didn’t know whether to be flattered or horrified.  “Um…her jumpsuit’s kind of tight, isn’t it?” I asked, staring at her chest.  

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“It’s not a jumpsuit, it’s a uniform,” he said, sounding annoyed.

First stop for Commander Shepard, and her voluptuous assets, was a planet under attack.  We went through the Mass Relay and took a shuttle down to the planet.

“You get to drive a Mako, now.”

The Mako resembled a moon rover, but with lots of upgrades.  I can drive a minivan, so this shouldn’t be too hard.

“Get inside it,” my son said, pointing at the screen.

Easier said than done. Remember what I said earlier about my experience with XBOX?  I move Commander Shepard behind the Mako, under the Mako, in front of the Mako, and on top of the Mako – but can never seem to get her inside the Mako.

My son shook his head and sighed.  “Here.” He pressed a button, and boom – I’m inside.

So off we go, driving around the planet – or in my case, driving as if I’m drunk around the planet.  Navigating the Mako is proving to be a difficult task.  After running over several innocents and lots of rocks, we finally reach our destination and get out.  

“See that sniper?”

“No.”

“Shoot him!”

“How?” I asked, still trying to locate the enemy.

“Press B!”

I pressed B, but apparently not fast enough.  I know this by the amount of blood that had seeped onto the screen.

“Let me help you.” My son snatched the controller from my hands, and with quick and skillful precision laid the sniper to rest.  He then proceeded to take me to the next checkpoint where a conversation between Commander Shepard and a hunky soldier by the name of Kaidan ensued.  “What do you want to say to him?”

I looked past Kaidan’s bulging biceps and saw that I got to pick my dialogue.  

“Your decisions affect the outcome of the story.”

This was a very neat aspect to Mass Effect that I quickly came to appreciate.  Shepard’s actions have consequences, and are the driving force for the storyboard. What you say and do dictates how things turn out. Very cool. I pick something from the dialogue box and Kaidan says something back to me.  Mmm, he has a dreamy voice.  Then, after a few minutes, he joins me in the Mako and we’re off to another war-torn place.  Now, at this point, my son still has the controller, and I really don’t think he’s going to give it back.  

“Why don’t I do everything for you – and you can just pick what you want to do and say?” he said while firing a missile at an enemy referred to as the Geth.

“That sounds great,” I replied, settling back into the chair.  

For the next four weeks, my son and I played Mass Effect, Mass Effect 2, and Mass Effect 3.  It was brimming with drama, depth, emotion, and morality – touching on subjects such as genocide and the sterilization of a barbaric race.  I came to love Shepard, Joker, Garrus, Liara, Miranda, Thane, Kaidan, Grunt, Wrex…all of the characters.  But what I loved most was the chance to be involved in my son’s life.

As I sat watching him kill a large Krogan, something that Frankie, from The Middle, once said popped into my mind. It was the homecoming episode and Frankie didn’t get that big, public moment she longed for with her son. That’s okay. This private little mother-son moment was just as special.

…and it was. 

 

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Note:  Belinda G. Buchanan is the author of After All Is Said And Done, The Monster of Silver Creek, and the recently released Seasons of Darkness.  All are available in paperback or e-book.

Salute to Dramatic Black & White Films – Doris Day

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For those of you have read my previous posts-you know that I love drama, and I just saw that in April, Doris Day turned 90.  First of all, Happy Birthday Doris!  Second of all, many of you are probably asking what does Doris Day and my first sentence have in common?

One word:  JULIE 

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This was made in 1956 and stars Day, Louis Jordan & Barry Sullivan.

I grew up watching Doris Day in all the romantic comedies and found her to be a comedic genius. But a few years ago, TCM (my favorite channel) was running a marathon of her movies and the first one up was Julie.  For those of you who haven’t seen it, here is a short synopsis:  Julie (played by Doris) is married to a concert pianist named Lyle (played by Louis Jordan).  During the course of a very casual conversation with him, she begins to suspect that he murdered her first husband, whom she thought had killed himself. What happens next becomes a dangerous game of pursuit as Lyle relentlessly follows her from city to city, forcing her to go into hiding.  Now I won’t spoil it, but this movie is 99 minutes of nail-biting, knuckle-gripping, butt-clenching suspense from the very opening scene all the way to the credits.  It is a must see!

After watching this film, my appreciation for Ms. Day increased tenfold.  Her ability to do drama is as good as it gets, and she did another turn four years later with Midnight Lace (also spectacular btw.)

Do you have a favorite drama that’s in black & white?  I’d love for you to tell me as I’m always looking for new ones to add to my collection.

Blog Hop on the Writing Process

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larryI’d to extend a big thank you to Larry Crane for inviting me to be a part of the Writing Process Blog Hop.  Transplanted to Maine mid-westerner Larry Crane brings an Illinois sensibility to his writing. Larry graduated from West Point, served nearly seven years in the Army as an Infantryman in Germany and Vietnam. He commuted to Wall Street for nearly 20 years. His writing includes articles for outdoor magazines, plays, short and long fiction. His most recent thriller novel, A Bridge to Treachery, and Baghdad on the Wabash and Other Plays and Stories, a collection of short plays and stories, are listed for sale on Amazon. In his spare time, Crane is president and hobbyist videographer for his local Public Access Television Station and is a volunteer at his local historical society. Larry and wife Jan live on the coast of Maine.

Larry’s Links:  Twitter     Webpage       Facebook      Goodreads      Google+       YouTube Trailer  

Now it’s my turn to give you a little insight about my writing process and why I do what I do:

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What am I working on?  –   I am currently in the middle of writing the sequel to The Monster of Silver Creek.  It is tentatively titled, Penance – and for good reason.  Guilt is a powerful thing, and Deputy Jack Collins is mired in it as he adjusts to fatherhood along with his new job as Chief of Police.  It isn’t long before a body of a young girl is discovered, having the same puncture marks on her as the serial killer’s previous victims.  Jack must determine if this is a copycat crime, or if the killer had an accomplice that has managed to slip by unnoticed.

How does my work differ from others of its genre?  –  In my novels, I take social issues such as alcoholism, abuse, and mental illness and give them to my characters.  This brings about a certain vulnerability to them, making them human.  Just as in real life, there are no easy answers to these problems, and they can’t be magically fixed by a few simple words.  These are issues that impact you long after they are over, defining who you are not only as a person, but as a member of society.

In my latest book, Seasons of Darkness, Everett Harrington is a father struggling to raise his family after the tragic suicide of his wife, Natalia.  Left alone with a son he can’t talk to, he chooses to spend his evenings drowning his sorrows in a bottle of scotch.  Sixteen-year-old Ethan, still ravaged by his mother’s death, turns to what he has seen his father take comfort in time and time again.  As they try to move on, Natalia’s struggle with mental illness is tenderly told through their eyes in vivid flashbacks that weaves throughout the story.

I am a firm believer in portraying my characters as close to real life as possible, warts and all.  In the real world, there’s no such thing as a white knight, and if you look closely at my heroes, you’ll find that their armor is tarnished.

Why do I write what I do?  –   Let me give you a visual demonstration:  If I’m flipping through the channels on TV and see that my choices are “No Down Payment” starring Tony Randall or “Send Me No Flowers” also with Tony Randall, I’m going to choose the first one.  Why?  Because in No Down Payment, Randall plays an alcoholic car salesman, trying to hang on to his marriage as he slowly destroys himself.  It’s drama, it’s real, it’s raw, it’s emotional ­– and I love it!  It stirs things inside of me that I can’t really explain.  Think about it, if Clark Gable hadn’t carried Vivien Leigh up that grand staircase, during a drunken rage one night, Gone With The Wind would probably not be the classic that it is today.

My slogan for my novels is:  Where Tall, Dark, and Handsome Meets High Drama.  When you combine these two things, you get an electrifying read.

How does your writing process work?  –  As I begin each novel, I make an outline of the major incidents that are going to occur.  This is rather easy for me, because I’ve already daydreamed my characters doing these very things.  Watching my book unfold in my mind allows me the ability to make bold decisions where they are concerned.  By doing this, I see the hurt in their faces, the subtle movements of their hands, and hear the inflections in their tone of voice.  It’s like making a movie and then putting it down on paper, scene by scene.

The hard part for me is writing the scene the way I see and hear it using only words.  There have been times I’ve stayed up until two in the morning feverishly pounding away on my keyboard and have fallen into bed with a sense of pride regarding the chapter I just wrote.  In the harsh light of day however, I re-read it and think it sucks.  I am my own worst enemy when it comes to critiquing what I’ve written, so much so, that at times, I think it hinders me from moving on.  If there is a scene that just isn’t working, I’ll ponder it every waking moment I get until I like it.  In the past there have been instances where I will wake up from dreaming (or from having a hot-flash) and immediately start thinking about the scene or paragraph I’m stuck on.

Once I am satisfied with my draft, I will edit it chapter by chapter, reading the last chapter first, and then the first chapter, and go back and forth until the pages meet in the middle.  Then when I am happy with every breath the characters draw, every subtle movement they make, and every word they speak, I put my name on it.

BLOG HOPPERS ON DECK:

It is my pleasure to introduce you to 3 other blog hoppers, so hop on over to their sites and see what they are up to.  Each one of these talented authors will be telling you about their writing practices next week on Monday March 31st.

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D. Bryant Simmons was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. She has earned a B.A. in Sociology and M.Ed. in Elementary Education. She is an author, mother, entrepreneur, and advocate for female empowerment.  Her books include, How To Knock A Bravebird From Her Perch, and The Boy Scout.

http://www.dbryantsimmons.com

http://bravebirdbooks.com/product/how-to-knock-a-bravebird-from-her-perch/

Joe Fishing 2012Joe Perrone Jr is an author whose diverse background includes a stint as a sportswriter with a prominent New Jersey newspaper, the Herald-News, and several years spent freelancing as an advertising copywriter.  He has had numerous short stories published in the Mid-Atlantic Fly Fishing Guide.  In addition to his writing, Joe spent ten years as a professional fishing guide on the historic Beaverkill River in New York’s Catskill Mountains.  Nearby Roscoe – “Trout Town USA” – serves as the setting for Joe’s last three Matt Davis mysteries, Opening Day (a 2012 BRAG medallion winner), Twice Bitten, and Broken Promises (a 2014 BRAG medallion recipient).  Roscoe is a place to which Joe returns as often as possible to fish his favorite waters and visit with long-time friends.  The first book in the Matt Davis Mystery Series was As the Twig is Bent, which reached #24 best seller in the Kindle book store when initially published.  Joe also authored one other novel, Escaping Innocence: A Story of Awakening, which is a coming-of-age tale set in the ’60s. His non-fiction work includes Gone Fishin’ with Kids (How to Take Your Kid Fishing and Still be Friends) and A “Real” Man’s Guide to Divorce (First, you bend over and . . . ).

When not writing, Joe can be found fly fishing the many quality trout streams found throughout the surrounding area of North Carolina.  He also enjoys fly tying, cooking (and eating), reading on his Kindle, listening to music (anything but rap, hip hop, or hard rock), car trips with his wife, Becky, and watching films.  He and his wife live in the mountains of western North Carolina, with their two calico cats, Cassie and Callie.

You can stop by and chat with Joe here:

Twitter    @authorjoep

Blog   www.joetheauthor.wordpress.com

Facebook:   Author Joe Perrone Jr

Website   www.joeperronejr.com

Email     joetheauthor@joeperronejr.com

bj robinsonAuthor, B. J. Robinson, is an award-winning, multi-published, Amazon best-selling author with four traditionally published novels as well as independently published short stories, novellas and novels. Her latest novel, River Oaks Plantation, was showcased in Southern Writers Magazine as a Must Read. Romance under the Oaks, her new historical romance releases the end of March.

She writes from Florida with a golden cocker spaniel named Sunflower, golden retriever named Honi, and a shelter cat named Frankie for company, blessed with a husband, children, and grandchildren. Jesus is her best friend. She’s an avid reader and passionate writer.

Visit her on facebook, or her amazon author page, or her blog.

My Smashwords Interview

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Interview with Belinda G. Buchanan

Tell us a little bit about the kinds of books you write?
I create stories that deal with very personal and social issues: Alcoholism, mental illness, adultery, domestic abuse as well as some other taboo subjects. My women are not weak, and my men are not always strong. You will find that my characters are not perfect – they are far from it, actually, because even heroes have a chink or two in their armor. It’s what makes them human, and I find that fascinating.  (more)

A story of hope – even in the darkest of times…an excerpt from Seasons of Darkness

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Many of you have asked, so I thought I would post an excerpt for your enjoyment!  Here is a snippet from Chapter 5:

Everett sped down the street trying to make up for lost time.  He was twenty minutes late for an appointment across town thanks to the ineptitude of his secretary who, as of fifteen minutes ago, was now a former employee.  He had no tolerance for silly mistakes.

He forged ahead through the intersection, ignoring the yellow light.  By the time he saw the standing water and the girl on the sidewalk, it was too late.  His tires sent a spray ten feet up in the air, drenching her from head to toe.

He cursed under his breath, pulling his car over.  He left the engine running as he got out and hurried towards her.  “Are you all right?”

The girl stood unmoving as if the water had frozen her to the sidewalk.

“I’m terribly sorry, miss,” he said in the most apologetic tone he could find.  “I didn’t see you walking there.”

She slowly parted her dripping hair with her fingers, revealing a set of piercing brown eyes.

“I’m terribly sorry,” he repeated.

“What kind of moron are you?”

“Apparently the kind that drives too fast,” he said, hoping to defuse her anger.

“Oh, I see,” she said, still glaring at him.  “You’re a comedic moron.”  She began smoothing her long, raven hair with her hands, but it did little to help her appearance.

Everett bent down and picked her textbook up from off the pavement.  “Can I give you a lift somewhere?”

“I think you’ve done quite enough,” she replied, snatching it from his fingers.  She pivoted around on her heel and began marching away, leaving a trail of wet footprints behind her.             

Everett headed back to his car feeling as if this day couldn’t possibly get any worse.  As he pulled back onto the street, he noticed her walking ahead of him.  He veered off to the side once more and rolled down his window.  “Where are you going?”

She glanced to her left.  “Are you following me?”

“Well,” he said, slowing down to match her pace, “you’re kind of hard to miss.”  He suddenly felt a stabbing pain in his heart from the set of daggers that flew from her eyes.  She obviously failed to see the humor in his remark.

He watched as her short, but beautiful legs carried her over to the bus stop where she angrily planted herself down on a bench.  He pressed on the brake and stretched his arm over the back of the seat.  “Let me give you a ride.  I can get you there quicker than the bus.”

She gave him an absurd look.  “Why on earth would I get in a car with you?  I don’t even know you.  You could be a serial killer or a rapist for all I know.”

He cocked his head sideways.  “I can assure you, I’m neither of those things.”

“And I’m just supposed to believe you, is that it?”

“I’m Everett Harrington,” he said, offering her his best smile.  “The jerk that ruined your day.”

The corners of her mouth twitched.  “Well, you’re damn right about that,” she said, standing up.

He got out of his car and opened the door for her.  “Where can I drop you?”

“Woodham Way.  It’s south of here.  Do you know it?”

“Yes,” he replied, sliding into his seat, but it was in the opposite direction in which he was headed.  He checked his watch before pulling away.

“Are you late for something?”

“Not anymore,” he answered, making a right at the light.

“Well, don’t blame me.  This is your own bloody fault.  If you had been paying more attention, none of this would have happened.”

He turned to look at her.  “Did I say anything about it being your fault?”

“You didn’t have to.  I know your type,” she said arrogantly.

“My type?”

“Yes.”

“What’s my type?”

“You’re a man, aren’t you?”

“You don’t know the first thing about me,” he said, feeling his jaw tighten.

“I know enough.”  She wrapped her fingers around the ends of her hair and squeezed, sending a stream of rainwater down on his custom leather interior.

Everett gripped the steering wheel until his knuckles turned white.  “Can you please not do that in here?”

“Would you prefer that I leave it in my hair?”

“I would prefer,” he said, trying to control his voice, “that you not do it on my seats.”

“Fine,” she muttered, dropping her hands.

“I didn’t catch your name,” he said after a drought of silence.

“That’s because I didn’t give it to you.”

Everett stifled a sigh.  This was shaping up to be a banner day.  As they drove towards the edge of town, he couldn’t help noticing her wet blouse.  It clung to her in the front, accentuating everything underneath it.  She glanced sideways at him, making him jerk his eyes back onto the road.

“Were you looking at my naughty bits?”

“No.”

“Yes, you were.”

“No.”

“You’re lying.”

“You looked cold,” he said, realizing she wasn’t going to let this drop.

“Well of course I’m cold, you idiot!  You and your bloody car just gave me a soaking!”

 He pressed on the accelerator and changed lanes, wishing he had just left her standing on the sidewalk.  He reached into the backseat and grabbed his blazer.  “Here.”

She draped it over the front of her, tucking her arms inside.

“You’re welcome,” he said flatly.

“Oh, I beg your pardon.  Thank you for giving me something to cover my shivering body with.”

The light up ahead turned yellow and Everett gunned the engine intending to run it, but the car in front of him decided to stop.  He stomped hard on the brake, bringing the car to a screeching halt.

“Christ!” she said, putting her hands against the dash as she fell forward.  “Is this your first day driving?”

“Is this your first day interacting with people?” he retorted.

She gave him an icy stare before turning her eyes back to the road.

Everett watched the light intently.  The second it changed he floored the accelerator, smiling inwardly as her head snapped against the back of the seat.

“Eblan,” she muttered under her breath.

He didn’t know what that meant, but was fairly certain it wasn’t a compliment.  Figuring it was pointless trying to make further conversation with her, he decidedly gave up.

He began to focus instead on how he could make up his meeting.  It was a meeting in which six weeks of planning had gone into, and one that he had been more than ready for.  It was also a meeting that he would be at right now if his secretary had remembered to tell him that it had been moved up an hour.

“Natalia Nisselovich,” she said, interrupting his thoughts.

“What?”

“That’s my name.”

“Is that Russian?”

She smiled at him, revealing just how beautiful she was, wet hair and all.  “Turn up here,” she said, pointing.

He made a left at the next street.

“Stop at the house with the blue shutters.”

He pulled into the driveway and got out to open the door for her.

“Thanks for the ride,” she said, handing him back his jacket.

“It was the least I could do.”

“Yes, it was.”

He smiled in spite of himself.  “Would you like to go out for coffee, sometime?”

She turned and began making her way up the drive.  “You know where I live.”

He leaned against the side of his car as he watched her walking away.  “So, is that a yes?” he called out.

She looked over her shoulder and flashed him another smile.

Did you enjoy reading this?  You can purchase a copy of Seasons of Darkness through Amazon:  http://www.amazon.com/Seasons-Darkness-Belinda-G-Buchanan-ebook/dp/B00EK9JLUC

Seasons of Darkness Final Kindle cover

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